The new resource page is designed to provide faculty members with teaching strategies and resources to assist them in implementing the new curriculum. Faculty Affairs | Professional Development | Diversity (FAPDD) and Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) are available to provide additional help.


Active Learning Strategies

Active learning is a process whereby learners engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis and evaluation of content. Cooperative learning, problem-based learning and the use of case methods and simulations are some approaches that promote active learning.

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Case Studies

Through short narratives, videos, data sets, historical artifacts or other materials; case studies present provocative questions and engage learners in the application of concepts and authentic problem-solving. The real or realistic observations and data provided in the case study help learners develop skills in higher-order thinking, communication and teamwork. Learners discuss observations, make predictions, analyze data, offer interpretations, make decisions, critique existing solutions and propose new avenues of investigation (Herreid, 1994).

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Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are generally simple, non-graded, anonymous, in-class activities designed to give you and your learners useful feedback on the teaching and learning process as it is happening.

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Clickers Audience Response Systems (ARS)

Audience response systems or clickers, as they’re commonly known, are designed to support communication and interaction in the learning environment. When implemented successfully, clickers can help engage learners, encourage interaction, and contribute to student learning.

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Collaborative Learning

Collaborative learning is based on the view that knowledge is a social construct. Collaborative activities are most often based on four principles

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Giving Feedback

The goal of formative feedback is to help students identify their strengths and weaknesses and target areas that need work.

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Interactive Lectures

Interactive lectures are didactic learning sessions in which the instructor uses an activity (sometimes called an “engagement trigger”) to promote learner engagement with the course material, at least once during the lecture, but ideally more than once. Familiar techniques include think-pair-share, one-minute paper, and muddiest point.

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Leading Discussions

Discussion can take place in a variety of contexts and disciplines, from seminars to labs to lectures. Engaging learners in discussion deepens their learning and motivation by propelling them to develop their own views and critical thinking skills.

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Multiple Choice Question Writing

Multiple choice test questions can be an effective and efficient way to assess learning outcomes. The key to taking advantage of its strengths, however, is construction of good multiple choice items.

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Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered approach in which students learn about a subject by working in groups to solve an open-ended problem. As a result, students learn both thinking strategies and and content knowledge.

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Team-Based Learning (TBL)

Team-Based Learning is an evidence-based collaborative learning teaching strategy designed around units of instruction, known as “modules,” that are taught in a three-step cycle: preparation, in-class readiness assurance testing, and application-focused exercise.

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Krista Hoffmann-Longtin

Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development
Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis